Humanities 2015-2016

Culver Academy requires 7 1/2 credits in Humanities.  United States History and three 12th grade Humanities electives are required.  The US History required is fulfilled through the American Studies in History, Literature and Culture course offered in the Junior year.

 

9th Grade Humanities

Western Perspectives – Greece through the Renaissance
4 terms, solid, 2 credits, B

Humanities 9 is an interdisciplinary course focusing on the ancient cultures of the Mediterranean and Europe from late antiquity through the Italian and Northern renaissances. The great classical cultures centered on Athens, Jerusalem, and Rome will be studied, as will the birth and evolution of the Medieval World. The rise and diffusion of Islam from the 7th through the 15th centuries is also a major theme. Texts include Homer’s The Odyssey, the Jewish and Christian bibles, the Qur’an, medieval or medieval-themed works, and Romeo and Juliet. Art, music, and architecture are also featured elements of the curriculum. Students learn to read, write, speak, and think critically about the human experience.

 

10th Grade Humanities 

Global Perspectives – Renaissance to Modern
4 terms, solid, 2 credits, C

Humanities 10 is an interdisciplinary course focusing on the modern world beginning with the early 17th century. Students study the literature, history and arts of Europe and non-western cultures from Asia, Africa, and the Middle East. As a result, students will gain a depper understanding of global patterns, the world's history, multiple perspectives, and global citizenships.  Early emphasis is placed on the Reformation, the scientific and industrial revolutions, and the political revolutions of the 18th and 19th centuries. Students also focus on European colonialism and its effects, the changing role of women and work, and the evolution of the concept of human rights. Overall course content, which also involves a significant current events component, is presented through the theme of globalization. Students explore and learn to think critically about topics such as progress, culture, nationalism, conflict, and global citizenship through discussions and writing in a variety of styles. Texts include The Merchant of Venice, Frankenstein, Things Fall Apart, Swallows of Kabul and White Tiger.

 

Global Perspectives with Advanced Placement World History
4 terms, solid, 2 credits, D

Like Humanities 10, Global Perspectives with AP World History is an interdisciplinary course focusing on globalization in the modern world.  As a result, students will gain a deeper understanding of global patterns, the world's history, multiple perspectives, and global citizenships.  Students develop critical thinking, speaking and writing skills through the study of literature, history and arts from a global perspective. The class covers the world including Europe, Asia, Africa, Latin America, the Middle East, and to a lesser extent North America.  Although the course emphasizes the time period since the Renaissance, the course also reviews earlier and ancient world history in order to prepare for the AP World History exam in May.  Preparation for the exam also includes extensive practice analyzing documents and constructing arguments in response to college-level essay questions.  Students will be expected to do most of the same readings and develop similiar skills as Global Perspectives course but will also be asked to read a greater quantity of challenging readings, command a large amount of historical information, and excel on multiple choice tests. Any student may register for this course; however, department approval is required to be official registered.  

 

11th Grade Humanities

American Studies in History, Literature, and Culture
4 terms, solid, 2 credits, B

This course seeks to develop critical thinking, reading, speaking, and writing skills by providing an integrated, disciplinary and interdisciplinary study of American literature, history, and culture.  Texts include The Lone Ranger and Tonto Fistfight in Heaven, The Declaration of Independence, The Constitution of the United States of America, The Narrative of the Life of Frederic Douglass, an American Slave, The Great Gatsby, Of Mice and Men, and Raisin in the Sun.

 

American Studies with Advanced Placement U.S. History
4 terms, solid, 2 credit, E 

The principal aim of this elective course is to prepare students for the AP U.S. History exam through the development of critical thinking, reading, speaking, and writing skills. At the same time it provides a complementary survey of American literature and culture, so as to provide an interdisciplinary understanding of the relationship between these fields in shaping the American experience. Texts include The Crucible and Of Mice and Men.  Any student may register for this course; however, department approval is required to be officially scheduled. 

 

American Studies with Advanced Placement English Language & Composition
4 terms, solid, 2 credit, D

This elective seeks to develop critical thinking, reading, speaking, and writing skills by providing an integrated study of American literature, history, and culture. There is a particular focus on close reading of applicable texts and intensive writing to prepare students for the AP English Language and Composition exam.  Texts include The Awakening, The Color Purple, The Declaration of Independence, The Constitution of the United States of America, The Narrative of the Life of Frederic Douglass, an American Slave, The Great Gatsby, Into the Wilde, and The Crucible. Any student may register for this course; however, department approval is required to be officially scheduled.

 

12th Grade Humanities

The Humanities 12 curriculum is designed around 3 main categories:  Text and Context, Writing Workshop and Citizenship.  Students are required to take 1 1/2 credits by selecting one course from each category.  Below is a quick reference of the course offerings:

 

Text and ContextWriting WorkshopCitizenship
African Literature Expository Writing Workshop: Food American Government
Leadership, Character and the American Civil War Expository Writing Workshop: Money, Money, Money

Comparative Government

 

Middle Eastern Literature

Myth and Literature

Thinking Smart, Living Well

Religious Texts as Literacy Sources

Shakespeare

Imaginative Writing Workshop: Devils & Dragons

Imaginative Writing Workshop: Historical Fact & Fiction

Creative Writing Workshop I

Honors Seminar: Creative Writing Portfolio

Polictical Economics

Racism in America

 Speech

Text and Context Course Offerings

Select one course from the offerings listed below, or register for an AP or honors course that meets this requirement.

African Literature & Culture
1 term, solid, 1/2 credit, B

This course will provide an introduction to the history, literature and culture of sub-Saharan Africa.  From its ancient civilizations to its modern predicaments, the story of this continent is one of diversity and complexity.  The essential question for this course is one of perspective:  whose story is it to tell?  Whose voice ought to be heard?  Whose language should be used?   We will explore issues of ethnicity, religion, colonialism, poverty and politics through a varieity of readings, films, art and music.  Various and often conflicting perspectives will be examined to expand our understanding of specific events and age-old questions regardin identity, death, power, forgiveness and the like.  After all, the African story differs only in its context:  the humanity is the same.

 

Global Literature & Culture: The Middle East (Middle Eastern Lit)
1 term, solid, 1/2 credit, B

In the post-September 11 world, understanding the Middle East is important since it figures so prominently in the politics and imagination of America. Yet despite how much we hear about the region, there is much that we don't understand about this large and diverse area that has a long and rich history.  We all have opinions or ideas about the region and the people who live there, but are they valid?  How do cultures and the people of the Middle East understand themselves and what shapes our understanding of them?  What is the role of religion in the region?  We will approach these questions through a study of literature and religion in order to gain a better understanding of the cultures, economics, politics, history and current events of this region.

 

Leadership, Character and the American Civil War
1 term, solid, 1/2 credit, B

This course is an analysis of the American Civil War through the lenses of character, leadership and the humanities.  The course asks the question:  What makes a good and effective leader?  The course answers the question by analyzing leadership traits, character strengths and resilience factors in the context of the Civil War, in particular the Battle of Gettysburg.  The course will do in-depth reading of and writing about Michael Shaara's The Killer Angels, the Pulitizer Prize winning classic narrative.  By integrating history, literature, and organizational theory, the course seeks to cultivate students' leadership ability, character strengths, and understanding of the culture of the Civil War in American life. 

 

Myth & Literature
1 term, solid, 1/2 credit, C

In Myth and Literature, we will consider narratives and related writings from specific traditions which provide chronological/geographical variety. The aim is to understand better the literary and historical environments out of which these mythological sources emerged. Specifically, this course will introduce fundamental approaches and concepts useful for the critical analysis of literature. In order to facilitate this analysis, the mythological sources have been selected to explore the theme of “The Hero’s Journey” as described by Joseph Campbell in his examination of “mono-myth.” There will be regular discussion and written assignments designed to assist and assess the defined goals of this course.

 

Religious Texts as Literary Sources
1 term, solid, 1/2 credit, B

Religious texts – narratives, poetry, dramas, and letters – help play a key role in any religion and culture. But they are also literary texts that have influenced other literary traditions, history, and fields such as archaeology. We will discuss issues such as historiography, primary verses secondary sources, oral tradition, and faith verses knowledge as we interpret religious texts and their influence on culture outside theology. This course will probe a variety of literary texts from a variety of religious traditions.

 

 Speech
1 term, solid, 1/2 credit, B

This course is designed to give students instruction in and exposure to the art of constructing and delivering a speech.  Primary emphasis is placed on extemporaneous speaking, but oratory and interpretation are also studied.  Each student gives a series of speeches that employ the techniques studied.  Students are also expected to write a number of compositions.

 

Thinking Smart, Living Well
1 term, solid, ½ credit, B

This class seeks to introduce students to something they think they know pretty well: their own minds. The ways that we usually talk about what we think, how we perceive, what it means to ‘know something’ and why we behave as we do are actually quite misleading given what science has begun to reveal about how the brain actually functions. By reading several different authors’ takes on the brain, students will learn about the invisible and unconscious forces that are always at work and how they are both a blessing and a curse. By raising our awareness of what our brains do automatically, we can learn to identify moments when we need to ‘push the pause button’ and slow down, look again and think again. Understanding how and when our brains work well and understanding when and how they don’t work quite so well can help us develop the tools we need to making living and learning better.

 

Writing Workshop Course Offerings

Select one course from the offerings listed below, or register for an AP or honors course that meets this requirement.

Expository Writing Workshop: Food
1 term, solid, 1/2 credit, C

What roles does food play in your life and the lives of others? What do these roles reveal about culture, values, and human nature? How are these messages transmitted throughout society? You will have opportunities to explore—in writing—a variety of food-related topics which may include (but are not limited to) the following: regional, national, and religious identity; relations between gender and food; body image and bodily health; belief systems about food production, consumption, and presentation; food as pleasure vs. biological need; moral concepts of control, indulgence, and pleasure; and the spaces in which we cook and eat. You will read and discuss food-related texts to inspire your thinking about these issues as well as provide models for effective writing. 
This is indeed a writing intensive course in which food-related topics are simply vehilces for practicing and improving your writing skills.  Expect a workshop-style course in which you collaborate with the teacher to set individual writing goals that you work to achieve by writing extensively on a daily basis.  Expect to recieve frequent feedback on your writing (from peers and teacher) that you use to review and improve your work.  Expect to refine the level of correctness with which you write by improving your use of conventions and MLA format (including citations).  Finally, expect a focus on writing stylistically effective expository pieces by carefully choosing your topic, audience, purpose and genre.

 

 Expository Writing Workshop: Money, Money, Money
1 term, solid, 1/2 credit, C

Money and power. Money and privilege.  Money and position.  Money influences our world in myriad ways-for greed and for good.  How does money inform our actions?  What are its capabilities and its limitations?  You will read the discuss money-related texts to inspire your thinking about these issues as well as provide models for effective writing.  You will explore-in writing- a variety of money-related topics.  Money and ___________.  You fill in the blank.
This is indeed a writing intensive course in which money-related topics are simply vehilces for practicing and improving your writing skills.  Expect a workshop-style course in which you collaborate with the teacher to set individual writing goals that you work to achieve by writing extensively on a daily basis.  Expect to recieve frequent feedback on your writing (from peers and teacher) that you use to review and improve your work.  Expect to refine the level of correctness with which you write by improving your use of conventions and MLA format (including citations).  Finally, expect a focus on writing stylistically effective expository pieces by carefully choosing your topic, audience, purpose and genre.

 

Imaginative Writing Workshop: Devils and Dragons
1 term, solid, 1/2 credit, C

Doom and destruction, power and persuasion: devils and dragons have played myriad roles in imaginative writing.  From fiction to fantasy to poetry and paradoy, devils and dragons lurk in our minds and imaginations as ways to better understand and express the range of the human condition.  Focusing on such creature and themes, this course offers a variety of writing techniques and practice within various genres to develop and hone the writer's expressive talents.  In a workshop format, we shall analyze short examples by published authors and by classmates to study how writers use languages to create such creatures and to explore the themes that these foreces of power embody.  The drafting process, revision, writing conventions, documentation, vocabulary development, class discussion and speaking performance will play key roles in this course.

 

Imaginative Writing Workshop: Historical Fact and Fiction
1 term, solid, 1/2 credit, C

 History informs our analytical minds and excites our wildest imaginations. What better way to spark your imaginative sensibilities than by unearthing facts about an historical time period and using them to create fantastical, research-based fiction? Focusing on both fact and fiction of specific historical time periods, this course offers a variety of writing techniques and practice within various genres to develop and hone your expressive talents. In a workshop format, we shall analyze short examples by published authors and by classmates to study how writers use language in creating fact-based fiction and to explore the themes of these eras in history. The drafting process, revision, writing conventions, documentation, vocabulary development, class discussion, and speaking performance will play key roles in this writing intensive course.

 

Creative Writing Workshop I
1 term, solid, 1/2 credit, C

(open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors who wish to pursue Honors in Creative Writing)
Students in this course will contribute both their own independent work and practice different techniques in and out of class in order to improve their craft.  The goal is for each to create an introductory portfolio of original work while learning the processes of drafting, rewriting, and critical and peer review, culminating in a formal presentation folder of their best work for review.  Students will be encouraged to submit work during and after class to the Quill, Vedette and off campus publications.  Students may apply from this course for Honors in Creative Writing, and Creative Writing Workshop B class. 

 

Honors Seminar: Creative Writing Portfolio
1 term, solid, 1/2 credit, C

This course, to be taken after Creative Writing Workshop A, provides the students with a workshop focused on the development and completion of a chapbook or portfolio of work for Honors. Students will continue to do more advanced work with revision and criticism, and develop a focus for their own writing. Students will complete more formal projects, including work with an author or authors whose work they would like to examine in a more formal way (combination of analysis, research essay, imitation of forms); or on a specific genre. There will be more formal development of peer review and critical skills, and more advanced study of various types of prose and/or poetry. By the end of the term, each Honors candidate will put together an extensive formal presentation portfolio/chapbook, to include a review of their own work in the context of other genres, and an essay on the writing process, as well as a body of original work. Students may choose to develop work from Creative Writing Workshop I, but must also produce new work for Writing Workshop II. The final portfolio or chapbook will be submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirement for Honors in Creative Writing. Course requirements: B+ or better in Creative Writing/Writing Workshop A and permission of instructor.

Citizenship Course Offerings

Select one course from the offerings listed below, or register for an AP or honors course that meets this requirement.

American Government
1 term, solid, 1/2 credit, C

In order to facilitate a personal connection and civic mindedness, this 12th-grade course focuses on the workings of our national government. The foundations of the U.S. government are laid bare by comparing the types and origins of government and by conducting an in-depth analysis of the Constitution. Political behavior focuses upon the roles played by political parties, interest groups, the voters, the electoral process, mass media, and public opinion. The course further investigates a contemporary look at the legislative, executive, and judicial branches of government. A review of civil liberties and civil rights concludes the study.

 

Comparative Government
1 term, solid, 1/2 credit, B

Comparative Government and Politics is an essential course of study for students in the twenty-first century.  Global events that impact our lives daily underscore the importance of understanding how governments and states operate differently from the United States.  This course focuses upon a theoretical framework in which to compare and contrast political systems from all parts of the world.  Students should grasp the commonalities as well as the differences amoung the states that are studied, and they shoudl be able to draw conclusions about those states based upon these investigations.  The course takes a country-by-country approach with intense concentration upon conceptual comparisions.  Following the introduction of concepts and theory and the analysis used in each country, the course progresses along much of the same path for each of the core countries to be studied.  Countries that could be studied -but certainly not limited to- are Great Britain, Russia, China, Mexico, Nigeria and Iran. Students will examine the following topics:  Sovereignity, authority and power; political institutions; citizens, society and the state; political and economic change and public policy.

 

Political Economics
1 term, solid, 1/2 credit, C

This 12th-grade course focuses on the moral issues of political economy.  To study these moral issues, students will use lenses such as the justification and distribution of private property, authoritative vs. market allocation, taxation and public goods, education, discrimination, the environment, and actions of government.  In this class, students will apply economic theories and concepts to the study of political action and the formation of policy in addition to learning how economic and political forces may shape the incentives and constraints of policymakers and other political actors.  Finally, students will begin to make use of class analysis as a way to understand the moral issues of political economy listed above.  Note: This is a course grounded in the controversies or disputes over the moral issues of political economy.  Students wishing to take a more skill-driven, classical economics course should visit the Ron Rubin School for the Entrepreneur course listings.

 

 Racism in America
1 term, solid, ½ credit, A

 This elective explores, through Aguirre & Turner’s text American Ethnicity, the nature of racism and prejudice in American society and culture. Both sociology models and historical examples are used in analyzing the development and maintenance of racism on individual, institutional, and cultural levels. Emphasized are the enslavement and segregation of African-Americans, the historical treatment of Native Americans, the emergence of hate groups throughout the country, the internment of Japanese-Americans during World War II, and the role of anti-Semitism in the American response to the Holocaust.

Humanities Advanced Placement and Honors Courses

Students who complete AP and Honors courses should review the information below to determine what courses they must take in addition to their AP and/or Honors courses for graduation.

 

If you take this course:You satisfy:You still need to take:
AP Government & Politics Writing WorkshopCitizenship Text and Context
AP European History Text and ContextWriting WorkshopCitizenship None
AP English Literature Text and ContextWriting Workshop Citizenship
Honors in Humanities, Seminar A Text and Context Writing Workshop (satisfied by Seminar B)Citizenship
Honors in Humanities, Seminar B Writing Workshop Text and Context (satisfied by Seminar A)Citizenship
Honors in Creative Writing Workshop I Writing Workshop Text and ContextCitizenship
Honors in Creative Writing Workshop II Writing Workshop Text and ContextCitizenship

 

Advanced Placement Government and Politics
4 terms, solid, 2 credits, C - satisfies Writing Workshop and Citizenship.  One course selection from Text & context required.

This 12th-grade elective focuses upon the study of politics and government from three perspectives: American, Comparative, and the Art of Political Writing.  Through close contextual reading of the US Constitution and related documents, the American Government and Politics segment will include an investigation of the Constitutional underpinnings of U.S. democracy; political beliefs and behaviors; political parties, interest groups, and mass media; institutions of national government; public policy; and civil liberties and civil rights. Comparative Government and Politics includes an introduction into comparative politics; sovereignty, authority, and power; political institutions; citizens, society, and the state; political and economic change; and public policy. The nations of Great Britain, Russia, China, Nigeria, Iran, and Mexico will serve as paradigms for these topics of study. The Art of Political Writing will include various types of writing for political purposes. Writing briefing papers, free-response questions, expository essays, persuasive opinions, research analysis, and political editorials will expose students to the various types of political writing essential for effective written communication.  Any student may register for this course; however, department approval is required to be officially scheduled. 

 

Advanced Placement European History & Literature
4 terms, solid, 2 credits, E - satisifes Text and Context, Writing Workshop and Citizenship requirements

This reading and writing intensive course provides a college-level introductory survey of modern European History from roughly A.D. 1300 to the present. It also prepares students for the Advanced Placement exam in European History. The goals of the course are to provide students with an overview and understanding of the themes, periods, events, and people of modern Europe; a good working knowledge of historical practice and writing; and the qualifications that will enable them to pursue upper level history, literature, policiatl science, international relations, economics and Humanities studies in college. Students will explore the literature, art and philosophy or Europe within historical, political, economic and social contexts.  These topics also help introduce them to the foundations of modern international relations, globalization, current international problems and human rights.  Students will examine the inter-relationship between these topics, as well as their roles in the developement of the identities of the individual, the state, the nation and Europe as an entitiy.  Students will also consider questions of cause and effect and change over time, as well as other basic elements of practicing history.   This course regularly asks for the analysis and synthesis of primary and secondary sources in written form, as well as the mastery of historical events, people, eras, and themes.  While this is an interdisciplinary Humanities class, students will be fully prepare to sit for the AP European History exam in May.  Any student may register for this course; however, department approval is required to be officially scheduled.

 

Advanced Placement English Literature
3 terms, solid, 1 1/2 credits, E - this course satisfies Text and Context and Writing Workshop.  One course selection from Citizenship is required.

AP English Literature offers a rigorous college-level approach to the study of literature and prepares students to take the AP English Literature exam in the spring.  Organized thematically, this course requires in-depth analysis and close reading of challenging British and American poetry, drama and novels.  Students are expected to write extensively and frequently on all texts covered in class, to understand and begin to use a number of the important critical approaches to analysis, and to participate in intense class discussion.  Any student may register for this course; however, department approval is required to be officially scheduled.

 

Humanities Honors - Seminar A
1 term, solid, 1/2 credit, C - satisfies Text and Context requirement.  One selection from Writing Workshop and Citizenship courses is required.

Honors Seminar A allows students to pursue deep study of a topic of their choice within the expertise of our faculty and have the opportunity to graduate with honors or a concentration in humanities or global studies.  In this course, students will select their honors topic and begin the literature review for their final product.  In addition to time for reading and research, students will master their skills at deep analysis of singular texts (primary sources and academic research) and synthesis of an argument that is based on multiple perspectives of the selected topic.  There will be interim benchmarks for honors candidates to update the Humanities Department Leadership team on their progress and metacognitive reflections.  The final product for this class is to complete the reading and research phases of the honors projects. Any student may register for this course; however, department approval is required to be officially scheduled.

 

Humanities Honors - Seminar B
1 term, solid, 1/2 credit, C - satisfies Writing Workshop requirement. One course from Citizenship is required.

In Honors Seminar B, students will begin to write their literature review of the topic they selected from the prior term. Students will master their writing skills related to synthesis of multiple perspectives. After the completion of the literature review, students will have earned the right to write original commentary on their chosen topic. Students will demonstrate their skill at constructing an argument, synthesizing multiple ideas and perspectives, and providing evidential support. There will be interim benchmarks for honors candidates to update the Humanities Department Leadership team on their progress and metacognitive reflections. The final product for this class is to complete the literature review, the original commentary, and the reflective piece for the presentation of the Honors product in the spring.

Contact Us

We process all inquires submitted via this form:

 






Attach a maximum of three doc, pdf, or jpg files.

LEFT ARROW BLOG
Attach a File

Feel free to also contact us at:

CULVER ACADEMIES
1300 ACADEMY RD.
CULVER, IN 46511

574.842.7000

EMERGENCIES or after 5PM EST

574.842.4088

574.842.8324