Science 2015 - 2016

To realize the Science Department mission - develop scientifically literate citizens - and Science Department understandings, a student must complete at least six terms of science.  Students must earn at least one (1) credit in each of the core disciplines of Physics, Chemistry and Life Sciences.  

 

Physics
2 terms, solid, 1 credit, B

How do things move and why do they move that way? If energy is conserved, why do we have to conserve energy?   How is the world different at its extremes? How do we know what we know?  These four questions guide the course, which emphasizes a conceptual understanding of physics while studying the causes and effects of motion, conservation of energy and momentum, the nature of matter, and the origin and nature of waves. Hands-on activities such as measuring the strength of nuclear radiation of different sources or exploring the relationship between the temperature of an object and the rate at which it cools play a significant role in our learning process. Students will have the option to pursue honors in this course by successfully completing several alternative activities and assessments. Most new students who have yet to have a high school physics experience should register for Physics. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Pre-Algebra.

 

Chemistry
2 terms, solid, 1 credit, B

In this basic chemistry course equal emphasis is placed on the theoretical and descriptive areas of study. Experiments involve quantitative and qualitative aspects. Hands-on activities involve a spiraling curriculum, inquiry, applications to the real world, and cooperative team work. The course introduces topics and examines relationships in the following sequence: the metric system and unit conversions, atomic structure, periodicity, bonding, formula writing and nomenclature, chemical reactions and equation writing, mole concept, stoichiometry, state of matter, gas laws, solutions, equilibrium, and acid/base chemistry.  Students will have the option to pursue honors in this course by successfully completing several alternative activities and assessments.
Prerequisites: Successful completion of Introductory Algebra A and Physics or Physics placement test. 

 

Biology
2 terms, solid, 1 credit, B

This lab-centered introductory course clarifies and broadens biological concepts and stresses unifying science principles. Major themes include biochemistry, cellular structure and function, genetics, evolution, ecology, and kingdom diversity. Content is strengthened with guided or independent experiments, and multimedia computers are used both as learning aids and as the medium for creative projects. Local field trips strengthen the lessons centered on ecological and environmental applications. Students should leave with a greater understanding and appreciation for life, a solid understanding of scientific methodology, and the ability to apply what they have learned to global issues.  Students will have the option to pursue honors in this course by successfully completing several alternative activities and assessments.  Pre-requisites:  Successful completion of Chemistry.

 

Human Anatomy & Physiology: Structure
1 term, solid, ½ credit, B

This introductory course emphasizes nomenclature and location of body structures and the physiological functions of body parts. Students discover the scientific process through a study of body systems whose primary responsibility is support and protection. Units covered include basic chemistry, genetics, cell structure and metabolism, tissues, integumentary system, skeletal system, muscular system, and nervous system.

 

Human Anatomy & Physiology: Transportation
1 term, solid, ½ credit, C

This introductory anatomy course is similar to the previous course, but with an emphasis on the study of the body systems whose primary responsibility is transportation. Units covered include cell structure and metabolism, tissues, digestion and nutrition, respiratory system, blood and blood cells, cardiovascular system, and urinary system.

 

Equine Veterinary Science
1 term, solid, 1/2 credit, B

This course is designed for students with an interest in horses.  Students will study the principles and practical application of feeding and nutrition, reproduction, genetics, wellness, lameness, farrier science, equine behavior, facility design and management.  Practical application is emphasized with live animal evaluation.

 

Astronomy
1 term, solid, 1/2 credit, A

Students apply their knowledge of physics and chemistry to investigate the behavior of astronomical objects.  They will learn about the motion of objects in the sky, the solar system and its origin, stars and their evolution, and properties of galaxies.  Other topics may include cosmology and life on other planets.  Pre-requisites: Physics, Chemistry and Geometry.

 

Environmental Science
1 term, solid, ½ credit, B 

Using our environment as a living laboratory, students in Environmental Science will discover the interconnectedness of the Earth, nature, and society. Students will build upon understandings from previous biological and physical science courses to examine the natural environment and explore the complexities behind the global and local decisions we make as humans and how these decisions impact the environment and the life it supports. Connections will be made to economics, politics, and sociology as students address environmental issues involving sustainability, resource management, and global changes. Students will participate in a class research project in coordination with a local organization, which will require excursions outside the normal class day.

 

Engineering I
1 term, solid, 1/2 credit, C

In this course, the student is introduced to the Engineering profession through participation, as a member of a team, in a student-driven design project.  The design projects will be multi-disciplinary in nature including but not limited to applications from civil, chemical, electrical, computer, biological and mechanical engineering.  The design teams will use principles from science, economics and math to brainstorm, design and propose their ideas.  Students will also learn the fundamentals of visual, oral and written technological communication along with a core set of computer-aided engineering modeling and analysis tools.  Pre-requisite:  Physics and Chemistry. 

 

Engineering II
1 term, solid, 1/2 credit, B 

This course is a continuation of Engineering I.  The design teams will build, test and evaluate a prototype of the design proposed in the first term.  Each team will present their prototype and project documentation in a final design review before a multi-disciplinary group of faculty and staff.  Pre-requisite:  Engineering I.   

 

Honors Seminar: Science Research
2 terms, solid, 1 credit, D

This laboratory science course provides the competency to plan and execute a self-directed scientific research project to fulfill requirements for graduating with Honors in Science. Research projects that qualify for local, state, national, or international competitions will be submitted. It is anticipated that as a student proceeds through and reflects upon the research phase of this course, the student will increase his/her appreciation for science and developed a working awareness of the interrelationship of science, technology, and society.

 

Advanced Placement Biology
3 terms, solid, 1½ credits, D

Advanced Placement Biology is engages students in the rigorous study of biological concepts in preparation for the AP Exam and possible advanced standing in their freshman year at college. Accompanied by in-depth laboratory experiments, this course provides a thorough background in methods used by biologists in solving research problems and biological principles including ecology, biochemistry, Mendelian genetics, evolution, genetic biotechnology, cellular structure and physiology, animal/plant structure and physiology, and animal behavior. Emphasis is placed on the integration of biological principles and other science disciplines.

 

Advanced Placement Chemistry
3 terms, solid, 1½ credits, C 

Advanced Placement Chemistry is the equivalent of a rigorous freshmen college course in general chemistry. Emphasis is placed on the theoretical aspects of chemistry and how these principles apply to the real world. Quantum theory of atomic structure is dealt with, as are modern theories of chemical bonding. In addition, the elements of physical chemistry, including stoichiometry, thermodynamics, chemical equilibrium, chemical kinetics, and electrochemistry are studied. Much effort is made to follow the Recommended Laboratory Program for Advanced Placement Chemistry from the College Board. Additional topics include some basics of inorganic and organic chemistry, as well of biochemistry. Students enrolled in the course are expected to take the Advanced Placement Chemistry Exam in May.  Pre-requisite:  Successful completion of Chemistry.

 

Advanced Placement Environmental Science
3 terms, solid, 1 ½ credit, C

The goal of the AP Environmental Science course is to provide students with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world, to identify and analyze environmental problems both natural and human-made, to evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems, and to examine alternative solutions for resolving and/or preventing them. Using our environment as a living laboratory, students in AP Environmental Science will discover the interconnectedness of the Earth, nature, and society. Students will build upon understandings from previous science courses to examine the natural environment and explore the complexities behind the global and local decisions we make as humans and how these decisions impact the environment and the life it supports. Connections will be made to economics, politics, and sociology as students address environmental issues involving sustainability, resource management, and global changes. Students will participate in a class research project which will require excursions outside the normal class day. Students enrolled in the course are expected to take the Advanced Placement Exam in Environmental Science.

 

Advanced Placement Physics C: Mechanics
2 terms, solid, 1 credit, D

Advanced Placement Physics C provides a systematic introduction to the principles of classical mechanics and emphasizes problem-solving. Topics are limited to those covered during a first semester physics course taken by science majors in college. Mathematics is used to understand the physics of the topics, and calculus will be used to derive equations and solve problems. Computers are used extensively to analyze and graph data, present simulations, and provide content. The goal of this course is to prepare the student for the required Mechanics section of the Advanced Placement Physics C test in May.  Pre-requisites: GPA of 3.0 or better in prior math courses.  If the student has not yet completed Calculus, enrollment in a Calculus course in Terms 1 and 2 is required.  Advanced Placement Physics C: Mechanics is only offered in Term 3 and 4.

 

Advanced Placement Physics 1
3 terms, solid, 1½ credits, D

Advanced Placement Physics 1 provides the opportunity for an in-depth, student-led inquiry of topics, as 25% of course time will be devoted to laboratory work, but it also maintains a strong empahsis on problem-solving using skills from algebra and geometry courses.  Topics in AP Physics 1 include motion, forces, momentum, energy, rotational motion, sound and simple circuits.  The goal is to prepare students for the required AP exam in May.  

 

Advanced Placement Physics C and Advanced Placement Calculus AB
4 terms, solid, 2 credits

This is an interdiscipllinary collaborative course designed to combine science and math in a seamless study over 4 terms in preparation for both the AP Physics C: Mechanics and AP Calculus AB exams in May.  AP Physics C provides a systematic introduction to the principles of classical mechanics.  Topics are equivalent to thos covered during a first semester physics course, including linear motion, dynamics, energy and rotation.  AP Calculus AB covers limits and the concept, properties, applications and computations of derivatives and integrals.  A computer and the TI-83/84 calculator are used extensively to analyze and graph data, present simulations and provide content to the course.    Pre-requisiste is a GPA of 3.0 or better in prior math and physics courses.

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Science 2015 - 2016

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